Resignation of Gen. David Petraeus send ripples across both sides of political aisle

Nov 10, 2012 Issues: -

Petraeus was praised throughout Washington for his candor, political acumen and, ironically, discretion. He was one of the nation’s most decorated four-star generals and one of the most prominent and acclaimed members of America’s military.

NY Daily News -- by Thomas M. DeFrank 

Big shots of the beltway were left dumbstruck by the downfall Gen. David Petraeus — a widely respected man once rumored to be bound for the White House.

Petraeus was praised throughout Washington for his candor, political acumen and, ironically, discretion. He was one of the nation’s most decorated four-star generals and one of the most prominent and acclaimed members of America’s military.

Expressions of regret poured in from both sides of the aisle.

Senate Intelligence Committee chair Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) called his downfall “an enormous loss for our nation’s intelligence community and for our country. . . I wish President Obama had not accepted this resignation, but I understand and respect the decision.”

Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), who worked closely with Petraeus as a member of the House Intelligence Committee, called him “one of America’s most outstanding and distinguished military leaders and a true American patriot.”

King added that he had no advance knowledge of Petraeus’ affair. “I was absolutely shocked,” he said.

A combat commander with a Ph.D. from Princeton who turned 60 on Wednesday, Petraeus was an architect of U.S. policy in Afghanistan and in Iraq, where he was credited with developing the U.S. troop “surge” that helped to turn the war around.

Former President George W. Bush called Petraeus his favorite general, a distinction that prompted Obama officials to view him with suspicion when they took over.